Do Positive Psychology studies really suggest that we can find happiness by faking it?

Do Positive Psychology studies really suggest that we can find happiness by faking it?

The study of happiness has become an industry unto itself.

WANT to know the secret to happiness? Fake it. Smile and pretend that you’re happy and you’ll soon begin to feel happier. At least that’s the message from some psychological studies that have found that behaving as if you’re happy can actually make you feel happier.

The studies, published in reputable psychological journals, have found that people asked to form their facial muscles into a smile report higher levels of happiness than those asked to assume angry facial expressions.

Not a week passes, it seems, without some new finding from the field of happiness studies making headlines. According to other recent studies, happy people flock together, while people who spend more time watching television report to being less happy than their non-TV watching peers.

So overgrown has the field of happiness research become that there is even a peer-reviewed journal, The Journal of Happiness Studies, devoted to publishing the latest research developments. And in May, Sydney will host the third “Happiness and its Causes”conference with happiness experts from around the globe.

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