A great reminder, from a Stanford psychologist no less, of 6 things you can do to be happy

A great reminder, from a Stanford psychologist no less, of 6 things you can do to be happy

via Business Insider by Tanya Lewis

If you want to be successful, you should work as hard as possible and suffer, right? Or so we’re told.

But that notion is completely wrong, according to psychologist Emma Seppala, science director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University.

As Seppala explains in her new book “The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success,” being successful and being happy are not mutually exclusive.

“We have this misconception that in order to be successful, we have to postpone or sacrifice our happiness now,” Seppala told Business Insider.

Seppala has scoured the research and identified six things that she says are key to being happy and successful:

1. Live in the moment

In today’s working world, we’re encouraged to work nonstop in order to stay on top of everything. We’re also constantly checking things off our to-do lists. But research suggests that when we’re focused on the present, we’re much more productive and more charismatic.

The Hungarian psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi describes the experience of being intensely focused on something while enjoying what you’re doing as the “flow” state. His research suggests that whether you’re an Olympic athlete or a mathematician, you are at your best when you’re in flow.

2. Be resilient

When we’re constantly working ourselves to the bone and feeling stressed, it activates our sympathetic nervous system, also known as the “fight or flight” response. Studies show that while short-term stress can be good for you, long-term stress is terrible for your health.

But if we can train ourselves to be more resilient to the setbacks in our lives, we’re more likely to bounce back from them, a 2004 study suggests. The study found that resilient people were able to recover faster (as measured by their heart rate and blood pressure) when they used positive emotions to respond to a stressful experience…

…keep reading the full & original article HERE