April 2021

via Psychology Today by Mark Travers KEY POINTS Living in a caring society tends to make people happier than making more money.Having a job is a key contributor to happiness.A sense of belonging, flexibility, and purpose at work were especially beneficial for psychological well-being. Source: Rawpixel / Pxhere Each...

via Thrive Global by Adrian Nita One of the most dangerous emotions we experience is “worry,” which we all deal with. Scientifically worrying is proven to harm us in many ways. Worry hurts us emotionally, physically, and mentally. Worry takes many different forms, and we...

via Happiful by Kat Nicholls We’ve found the word to describe how we feel. So how do we stop languishing and start flourishing? “The actual meaning of meh”, this is what a friend wrote as she dropped a link to an Instagram post from The New York Times into...

via Thrive Global by Jessica Miller “Instead of worrying about what you cannot control, shift your energy to what you can create.” –Roy T. Bennett.  After coming across this quote, I came to the realization that individuals like you and I obsessively over-analyze every situation. Constantly...

via Psychology Today by Christopher Bergland When it comes to improving psychological well-being, there are lots of options but surprisingly little evidence-based knowledge about how effectively each one—in and of itself or in combination with other interventions—optimally improves mental states of well-being. A new systematic review and...

via Forbes by Tracy Brower There’s plenty of evidence that happy employees are more engaged, productive and effective—and they contribute more to success and the bottom line. As a leader, you have an opportunity to create the conditions for happiness. And it’s a good idea—because it’s...

via Real Simple by Kirsten Nunez How well do you know yourself? If you're like most people, you're probably familiar with the basics: You like this, hate that, and have a knack for a certain skill. But what about your behaviors and thoughts—and how they affect...

via Psychology Today by Susan Newman KEY POINTS Media messages about missing children prompted fear in parents, who then took a protective, vigilant stance.Gen Z and Millennials, taught not to talk to strangers, grew up without learning how to interact with strangers at all.As a social species,...

via Very Well Mind by Barbara Field How you think about your future is bound up with your well-being. Positive future thinking (PFT) is an important component of healthy cognitive functioning. When people can’t imagine a positive future, that negative view often becomes a central...