July 2021

via Psychology Today by Susan Krauss Whitbourne KEY POINTS Happiness can have dysfunctional as well as functional effects on well-being.Irrational happiness beliefs include feeling that you should, must, and ought to be happy.Being convinced that you can fix the things that detract from your happiness can...

via The Atlantic by Arthur C Brooks The 2021 academy award for Best Picture—covering the prior year, when many of us were stuck at home—was awarded, ironically, to Nomadland, a film about a woman who has no permanent home. The movie follows Fern (Frances McDormand), a 60-something widow...

via FastCompany by Art Markman Over the past decade, it has become clearer to many that being “on” 24/7/365 is not a recipe for success. Discussions about work-life balance and the need to take vacations are signs that we understand that getting away from work is important for...

via Psychology Today by Jutta Joormann KEY POINTS Experiential diversity—going to new or different places and doing different things—can boost well-being, research suggests.A study using geotracking of participants found that on days when they went to a wider range of places, their positive emotions were higher.Increasing one's...

via Fast Company by Aisha Beau-Shine The road to self-love is a winding one, with self-talk as the navigation system. It’s no secret that the way we communicate with ourselves plays a major role in the way we see and experience the world around us. That’s why being mindful...

via Parade by Stephanie Oliveira Nguyen RuPaul—drag royalty, writer and Emmy-winning reality TV host— famously asked, “If you can’t love yourself, how the hell are you gonna love somebody else?” Potent words during Pride Month, when the exuberant celebration of being oneself can overwhelm those who are...