Author: Dr Happy

via Thrive Global by Jessica Miller “Instead of worrying about what you cannot control, shift your energy to what you can create.” –Roy T. Bennett.  After coming across this quote, I came to the realization that individuals like you and I obsessively over-analyze every situation. Constantly...

via Psychology Today by Christopher Bergland When it comes to improving psychological well-being, there are lots of options but surprisingly little evidence-based knowledge about how effectively each one—in and of itself or in combination with other interventions—optimally improves mental states of well-being. A new systematic review and...

via Forbes by Tracy Brower There’s plenty of evidence that happy employees are more engaged, productive and effective—and they contribute more to success and the bottom line. As a leader, you have an opportunity to create the conditions for happiness. And it’s a good idea—because it’s...

via Real Simple by Kirsten Nunez How well do you know yourself? If you're like most people, you're probably familiar with the basics: You like this, hate that, and have a knack for a certain skill. But what about your behaviors and thoughts—and how they affect...

via Psychology Today by Susan Newman KEY POINTS Media messages about missing children prompted fear in parents, who then took a protective, vigilant stance.Gen Z and Millennials, taught not to talk to strangers, grew up without learning how to interact with strangers at all.As a social species,...

via Very Well Mind by Barbara Field How you think about your future is bound up with your well-being. Positive future thinking (PFT) is an important component of healthy cognitive functioning. When people can’t imagine a positive future, that negative view often becomes a central...

via Forge by Laura Vanderkam We’ve all heard the maxim that money can’t buy happiness. But what if it sort of can? Or at least a little smidge of happiness? Or think of it this way: Let’s say you’ve found yourself with a bit of...

via Psychology Today by Marianna Pogosyan KEY POINTS Past research has demonstrated that optimism can benefit happiness, relationships, and health.But defensive pessimism—setting low expectations and considering worst-case scenarios—can help reduce anxiety.Defensive pessimism is most useful when negative outcomes are important to consider and when they can be...

via Very Well Mind by Amy Morin Our Reader Asks When I share good news with some of my friends or family members, they immediately point out the negative. Or, when I ask them how they’re doing, they just list all the bad things going on in...