Author: Dr Happy

via Forbes by Jodie Cook There are some people who are able to achieve incredible success and live extraordinary lives. They have the same number of hours in their day as anyone else, and they started from zero too. It’s possible because their success is now...

via the Harvard Business Review by Alice Boyes The Covid-19 crisis and its fallout — including recession, layoffs, and uneven economic pain — as well as recent protests over police brutality and demands for racial justice have presented many of us with challenges that we’ve not...

via Psychology Today by Susan Krauss Whitbourne The emphasis in positive psychology has, since its inception, focused on happiness as the key feature of well-being. The most widely-used survey studies of well-being typically ask participants to rate their current, momentary, happiness on a scale of 1 to 10. Using these...

via Medium by Marta Zaraska A group of elderly Japanese women sits around a long table, its surface covered with sheets of paper and stacks of pressed flowers. The atmosphere is cheerful, full of friendly banter. An energetic 84-year-old, Michiko, shuffles through the supplies, picking...

via Forbes by Celinne Da Costa Ask yourself this question: “What does wealth and success really mean to me?” If you’re like most people, the answer is probably something along the lines of a giant mansion, private jets, designer clothes, and luxury cars. For the longest time,...

via Forbes by Rob Dube For many, pre-COVID life was pretty stressful. Now, with a global pandemic, uncertainty for the future, and worldwide protests, our stress levels are approaching new levels. I’m grateful to have had the opportunity to chat with Dr. Elizabeth Boham—a true visionary behind...

via Psychology Today by Frank McAndrew In the 1990s, a psychologist named Martin Seligman led the positive psychology movement, which placed the study of human happiness and living a good life squarely at the center of psychological research and theory. It continued a trend that began in the 1960s with humanistic and existential psychology, which emphasized the...

via Psychology Today by Abigail Brenner It’s clear that by the time we’ve lived a few decades, for most of us, a lot will have happened to us—both the changes and challenges that are expected in the course of living, as well as those unexpected ones...

via Psychology Today by Najma Khorrami As a Crisis Counselor volunteer, it’s clear that mental health is suffering in this country.  Without exploring all the different factors that go into the worsening mental health condition, there is one thing we can do: use gratitude to pull ourselves...